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Historic bridges

The landscape at Gundagai is dominated by four bridges spanning the Murrumbidgee flats: the historic Prince Alfred Bridge, the timber Railway Bridge, and now the dual Sheahan bridges of the Hume Highway.

The timber viaducts are wonderful examples of early engineering solutions to crossing a major flood plain. Their national significance is recognised with listing by the National Trust. They are a spectacular latticework of wooden trusses, spanning the flood plains and River.

Follow the River Walk from Yarri Park – they are well worth a look (follow the signs or pick up a brochure from the Visitor Centre).

Prince Alfred Bridge

The Prince Alfred Bridge was built in 1866, the first major crossing spanning the Murumbidgee River. It formed part of the Hume Highway until it was replaced by the first Sheahan Bridge built in 1976. The Prince Alfred Bridge is the longest timber viaduct in Australia and has been classified by the National Trust as a structure whose preservation is essential to Australia’s heritage.

Railway Bridge

The other famous bridge is the Railway Bridge which was completed in 1902. The viaduct is 819.4m long.